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Closed FluorCam

Closed FluorCam FC 800-C represents a highly innovative, robust and user friendly world-wide used system for combined multispectral and kinetic fluorescence imaging. It consists of a CCD camera, four to five fixed LED panels (4 + 1 additional, which is not included in the standard setup) and, optionally, of a filter wheel equipped with up to 7 different emission filters. The LED panels in size of 13 x 13 cm provide uniform irradiance over sample area – suitable for imaging of small plants (such as Arabidopsis thaliana), detached leaves, mosses, lichens, plated algal colonies or multi-well plates with algal suspensions, etc. The system is very compact and allows easy dark adaptation of an investigated sample.

The Closed FluorCam FC 800-C generates images of fluorescence signal at any moment of the experiment and presents them using a false color scale. Full kinetic analysis is available. In all applications, the camera allows imaging of fluorescence transients that are induced by actinic light or by saturating flashes. The timing and amplitude of actinic irradiance are determined by user-defined protocols.

Standard version of the FluorCam system includes four super bright LED panels 13 x 13 cm. One pair of LED panels provides Measuring Light and Actinic Light 1 (red-orange 617 nm in standard setup). Other two panels provide Actinic Light 2 and Saturating Pulse (in standard version cool white, typically 6500 K). Other available (but optional) wavelengths for light sources are: royal-blue (447 nm), blue (470 nm), green (530 nm), cyan (505 nm), red (627 nm), deep-red (655 nm), amber (590 nm) - these lights sources are only for customized FluorCam versions. Additional LED panel may be added to increase the colour spectrum of the light sources for multi-colour fluorescence measurements. Additional panel is mounted around the camera. Available colours are: far-red (740 nm), deep-red (660 nm), ultra-violet (365 or 385 nm), green (523 nm), amber (590 nm). Other options available upon request.

The FluorCam FC 800-C also includes a high-performance PC and comprehensive software package including full system control, data acquisition and image processing. For an experienced professional, the software offers a sophisticated programming language that can be used for designing novel timing and measuring sequences.

  • FV/FM
  • Kautsky induction
  • Quenching analysis
  • Light curve
  • Steady state fluorescence, e.g., ChlF, GFP and other FPs (filter wheel required)
  • Multicolor fluorescence, e.g., ChlF, blue, green, red and far-red plant fluorescence (optional module required)
  • QA re-oxidation (optional module required)
  • Fast fluorescence induction (OJIP) with 1µs resolution (optional module required)
  • PAR absorptivity and NDVI reflectance index (optional module required)
  • Closed FluorCam
  • Measured parameters: FO, FM, FV, FO', FM', FV', FT
  • More than 50 calculated parameters: FV/FM, FV'/FM', PhiPSII , NPQ, qN, qP, Rfd, ETR (via Light Curve protocol), PAR-absorptivity coefficient, and many others
  • 52 Images in One Measurement
    Images of More Than 50 Calculated Parameters in One Measurement
  • Screening for photosynthetic performance and metabolic perturbations
  • Detection of biotic and abiotic stress
  • Plant’s resistance or susceptibility to various stress factors
  • Nematodes fluorescence and behavior
  • Stomatal patchiness
  • Yield improvement
  • Growth and development
  • Nematodes Fluorescence and Movement
  • Leaves, small plants, fruits, vegetables
  • Mosses, lichens
  • Cyanobacteria, green algae
  • Nematodes
  • Selectable shelf system for different plant size
  • LED panels 13 x 13 cm for uniform illumination over sample area
  • Predefined imaging masks for 384-well plate, 96-well plate, Petri dish, etc.
  • Dark room for adaptation
  • Standard version of the FluorCam system includes four super bright LED panels 13 x 13 cm. One pair of LED panels provides Measuring Light and Actinic Light 1 (red-orange 617 nm in standard version). Other two panels provide Actinic Light 2 and Saturating Pulse (cool white 6500 K in standard version).
  • Other available wavelengths for light sources are: royal-blue (447 nm), blue (470 nm), green (530 nm), cyan (505 nm), red (627 nm), deep-red (655 nm), amber (590 nm) - these lights sources are mounted only in customized FluorCam versions.
  • Additional LED panel may be added to increase the colour spectrum of the light sources for multi-colour fluorescence measurements. Additional panel is mounted around the camera. Available colours are: far-red (740 nm), deep-red (660 nm), ultra-violet (365 or 385 nm), green (523 nm), amber (590 nm). Other options available upon request.
  • Actinic light intensity:
    - 300-2,000 µmol(photons)/m².s in the standard version depending on light wavelength,
    - up to 3,000 µmol(photons)/m².s in the light-upgraded version - please inquire at: zc.isp@ofni
  • Super pulse intensity:
    - up to 4,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in the standard version),
    - up to 6,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in the light-upgraded version - please inquire at: zc.isp@ofni
  • Single Turnover Flash (STF): 120,000 µmol(photons)/m².s in 100µs pulse (in the QA re-oxidation version)
  • Comparison of light intensities reachable by the standard and light upgraded (QA) panels:
    FluorCam FC-800 - Standard Version
    Light Type Actinic 1
    Color red-orange        
    Wavelength [nm] 617        
    Intensity [umol] 200-300        
     
    Light Type Actinic 2
    Color cool white      
    Wavelength [nm] 4500 - 10000 K        
    Intensity [umol] 2000        
     
    Light Type Saturating Pulse
    Color cool white    
    Wavelength [nm] 4500 - 10000 K        
    Intensity [umol] 4000        

    FluorCam FC-800 - Light Upgraded Customized Version / QA Version
    Light Type Actinic 1
    Color red-orange        
    Wavelength [nm] 617        
    Intensity [umol] 2000        
     
    Light Type Actinic 2
    Color red-orange royal-blue cool white neutral white warm white
    Wavelength [nm] 617 447 4500 - 10000 K 3500 - 4500 K 2540 - 3500 K
    Intensity [umol] 3000 3000 3000    
     
    Light Type Saturating Pulse
    Color red-orange royal-blue cool white neutral white warm white
    Wavelength [nm] 617 447 4500 - 10000 K 3500 - 4500 K 2540 - 3500 K
    Intensity [umol] 6000 6000 6000    
  • 7 position filter wheel (optional)
  • Chlorophyll fluorescence (high pass 695 nm, low pass 780 nm), GFP (high pass 495, low pass 660 nm, band pass 505/560 nm), PAR (clear glass), YFP, CY3, CY5, as well as other fluorescence colors
  • See also: Closed FluorCam GFP Version for detection and imaging of GFP, red-shifted GFP, or blue-emitting protein variants
  • PSI LED panels used for excitation of most common fluorochromes
    PSI LED panels used for excitation of most common fluorochromes
  • List of most common fluorochromes and types of suitable excitation LED panels
    List of most common fluorochromes and types of suitable excitation LED panels
  • High-sensitivity camera
  • Advantageous for rapid processes imaging
  • Two operating modes:
    - video (ChlF kinetics measurement),
    - snapshot (long integration time for FPs detection)
  • 720 x 560 pixels
  • A/D: 12 bit (4096 grey levels)
  • 8.6 µm x 8.3 µm pixel size
  • 50 images per second
  • Operating Temperature 0 to +50 °C
  • Operating Humidity 0- 90% (non-condensing)
  • Interface connector: Gigabit Ethernet
  • Closed FluorCam
  • High-resolution camera
  • Intended for combined measurement of ChlF and detection of weak steady-state fluorescence signals (such as GFP) with long integration times or applications where the higher spatial resolution is of highest importance (microscopy)
  • Progressive scan CCD, 1.4 M pixel sensor
  • A/D: 16 bit (65,536 grey levels)
  • 6.45 µm x 6.45 µm pixel size
  • Two operating modes:
    - video (ChlF kinetics measurement),
    - snapshot (long integration time for FPs detection)
  • Resolution:
    1360 x 1024 pixels; 20 images per second
  • Binning option: 2x2 - 680 x 512 pixels, 20 images per second
  • Operating Temperature 0 to +50 °C
  • Operating Humidity 0- 90% (non-condensing)
  • Interface connector: Gigabit Ethernet
  • High-speed camera
  • Intended for high speed fluorescence imaging, fast fluorescence kinetics, OJIP protocol and other applications where high speed imaging is beneficial
  • Global shutter CMOS, 1.3 M pixel sensor
  • A/D: 12 bit (4096 grey levels)
  • 6.6 µm x 6.6 µm pixel size
  • Frame rate:
    - 1280 x 1024 pixels; 1000 images per second
    - 640 x 512 pixels; 4000 images per second
    - 640 x 256 pixels; 8000 images per second
    - 640 x 128 pixels; 16000 images per second
    - Faster frame rates with smaller resolution/li>
  • Binning option: 2x2 - 640 x 512 pixels, 4000 images per second
  • Operating Temperature 0 to +50 °C
  • Operating Humidity 0- 90% (non-condensing)
  • Interface connector: Gigabit Ethernet
  • Fully automated control of the whole FluorCam system
  • Image acquisition through automated experimental protocols:
    - numerous predefined protocols,
    - possibility to create user defined protocols via a Windows Wizard,
    - multiple (automatically repeated) experiments,
    - Barcode reader support
  • Image processing tools:
    - automatic or manual image segmentation – e.g., labeling of individual plants,
    - analysis of kinetic data from all samples within the field of view,
    - numerous image manipulation tools,
    - export to text file, avi, bmp or raw data formats
  • Windows 2000, XP, Vista, W7 compatible*
  • FluorCam Software
  • FluorCam Software
* Windows 2000, Windows XP, Vista, and W7 are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
  • Fluorescence Parameters:
    - Measured parameters: FO, FM, FV, FO', FM', FV', FT
    - More than 50 calculated parameters: FV/FM, FV'/FM', PhiPSII , NPQ, qN, qP, Rfd, PAR-absorptivity coefficient, and many others
  • Light Sources:
    Standard: red-orange (617 nm), cool white (typical colour temperature 6500 K)
    Optional: royal-blue (447 nm), blue (470 nm), green (530 nm), cyan (505 nm), red (627 nm), deep-red (655 nm), amber (590 nm)
  • Super Pulse Intensity:
    - 4,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in standard version)
    - 6,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in light-upgraded version)
  • Actinic Light Intensity:
    Up to 2,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in standard version)
    Up to 3,000 µmol(photons)/m².s (in light-upgraded version)
  • Filter Wheel:
    7 positions
  • Light Regime:
    Static or dynamic (sinus form)
  • Custom-Defined Protocols:
    Variable timing, special language and scripts
  • CCD Detector Wavelength Range:
    400 – 1000 nm
  • CCD Format:
    - 720 x 560 pixels (TOMI-1 camera)
    - 1360 x 1024 pixels (TOMI-2 camera)
    - 1280 x 1024 pixels (TOMI-3 camera)
  • Pixel Size:
    - 8.20 µm x 8.40 µm (TOMI-1)
    - 6.45 µm x 6.45 µm (TOMI-2)
    - 6.60 µm x 6.60 µm (TOMI-3)
  • A/D bit Resolution:
    - 12 bit (TOMI-1)
    - 16 bit (TOMI-2)
    - 12 bit (TOMI-3)
  • Spectral Response:
    QE max at 540 nm (~70 %), 50 % roll-off at 400 nm and 650 nm
  • Read-Out Noise:
    Less than 12 electrons RMS - typically only 10 electrons
  • Full-Well Capacity:
    Greater than 70,000 electrons (unbinned)
  • Imaging Frequency:
    Maximum 50 frames per second
  • Bios:
    Upgradeable firmware
  • Interface Connector:
    Gigabit Ethernet
  • Outer Dimension:
    471 mm (W) x 473 mm (D) x 512 mm (H)
  • Inner Dimension:
    450 mm (W) x 450 mm (D) x 400 mm (H)
  • Weight:
    Appr. 36 kg
  • Power Input:
    Appr. 1100 W
  • Electrical:
    90 – 240 V
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  • KVÍDEROVÁ J., ELSTER J. AND ŠIMEK M. (2011): ). In situ response of Nostoc commune s.l. colonies to desiccation in Central Svalbard, Norwegian High Arctic. Fottea. Volume 11, Pages 87–97.
  • PENG L. and SHIKANAI T. (2011): Supercomplex formation with photosystem I is required for the stabilization of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex in Arabidopsis. Plant Physilogy 155: 1629-1639.
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  • PARK S. J., KIM D. Y., YOO S. Y. et al. (2010): Response of Leaf Pigment and Chlorophyll Fluorescence to Light Quality in Soybean (Glycine max Merr. var Seoritae ). Korean Journal of Soil Science and Fertilizer. Volume 43,Pages 400-406.
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Pricing

  • Orders and Payments
  • Closed FluorCam FC 800-C/1010-S
    13.990,- €
  • Closed FluorCam FC 800-C/1010-CUST
    Please inquire,- €
  • Additional Far-Red Light Panel
    1.990,- €
  • Additional Ultraviolet Light Panel
    2.990,- €
  • Additional Single Color Light Panel
    2.490,- €
  • Additional Bi-Color Light Panel
    2.790,- €
  • Surcharge for High Resolution Camera TOMI-2 *
    4.000,- €
  • 7-Position Filter Wheel
    3.490,- €
  • QA-Reoxidation Module
    11.000,- €
  • PAR Absorptivity and NDVI Module
    5.480,- €
  • Multicolor Plant Module *
    8.990,- €
  • Fast Fluorescence Induction (OJIP) Module
    6.900,- €
  • Advanced Multiple Function for FluorCam Software
    400,- €
  • Advanced Module for Automatic and Programmable Image Acquisition and Data Management
    5.990,- €
  • Grid for Sample Holders
    20,- €
  • Barcode Reader with Supporting Software
    910,- €
  • Additional Protective Glasses *
    19,- €

Closed FluorCam Versions

Closed FluorCam FC 800-C/1010-S
Includes FluorCam control unit, measuring box with adjustable shelf, high-sensitivity camera 720 x 560 px, four LED light panels (13 x 13 cm; two red-orange panels, two white panels), filter for Chl fluorescence, control PC, software package, user’s guide.


Closed FluorCam FC 800-C/1010-CUST
Includes FluorCam control unit, measuring box with adjustable shelf, high-sensitivity camera 720 x 560 px or high-resolution camera, four LED light panels (13 x 13 cm; selectable wavelengths), filter for Chl fluorescence (optionally other filters and/or filter wheel), control PC, software package, user’s guide.

Optional Features and Accessories

High Resolution Camera TOMI-2
This camera (resolution 1360 x 1024 px, 20 images per second) is intended for combined measurement of ChlF and detection of weak steady-state fluorescence signals (such as GFP) with long integration times or applications where the higher spatial resolution is of highest importance (microscopy).


QA-Reoxidation Module
High-end option allowing determination of QA-reoxidation kinetics. QA-reoxidation is recorded in a pump-and-probe manner, i.e. using repetitive flashes and recording with variable delay after each flash.


PAR-Absorptivity and NDVI Module
High-end option for measuring PAR absorptivity and NDVI reflectance index. It includes 7-position filter wheel, light panel 13 x 13 cm (installed round the camera and mounted with far-red LEDs 740 nm + deep-red LEDs 660 nm) and a glass filter. PAR-measurement is based on reflectance of plants in near infrared region and in the visible red range of spectrum. NDVI is used as vegetative index for predicting photosynthetic activity.
IMPORTANT NOTES: To be used only with FC 800-C/1010, FC 800-C/1010-GPF or FC 800-O/1010. This module cannot be used with the Multicolor Plant Module in FC 800-C/1010 or FC 800-C/1010-GPF.


Multicolor Plant Module
High-end option for measuring emission spectra in plants (according to Lichtenthaler and Bushmann). It includes 7-position filter wheel, UV LED light panel (installed round the camera and mounted with 4 UV LEDs 380 nm), four filters - BLUE (FF01-440/40), GREEN (FF02-520/28), RED (FF01-690/8), FAR-RED (FF01-747/33) - and a special software module.
IMPORTANT NOTES: To be used only in the FC 800-C/1010, FC 800-C/1010-GPF or FC 800-O/1010. This module cannot be used with the PAR-Absorptivity and NDVI Module in the FC 800-C/1010 or FC 800-C/1010-GPF.


Fast Fluorescence Induction (OJIP) Module
Electronic module for tracking fast fluorescence induction – OJIP curve. Includes a special electronic board and measuring protocol. The processes are recorded in multiple light exposures, each with a variable delay after the light is switched on.


Filter Wheel
7-position software-controlled filter wheel allows for imaging in different emission bands. Filters are easily interchangeable.


Additional LED Light Panels
Additional LED light panel is mounted at the top part of the FluorCam System. It is located under the camera; the objective of the camera is inserted in the central opening of this panel. The panel widens the possibility of employing more excitation colors for special applications. It is equipped with 4 high-power LEDs in one-channel version, or 8 high-power LEDs in two-channel version. Available colours are: far-red (740 nm), deep-red (660 nm), ultra-violet (365 or 385 nm), green (523 nm), amber (590 nm). Other options available upon request.
Ultraviolet Panel (365 or 385 nm): Recommended use: (1) multicolor fluorescence - UV excited blue F440, green F520, red F680, and infra-red F740 (must be accompanied with the filter wheel and high-resolution CCD); (2) excitation source for wtGFP, DAPI (filter wheel and high-resolution CCD required). Optical power 1,5 W.
Blue Panel (470 nm): Recommended use: (1) excitation source for EGFP (must be accompanied with the filter wheel and high-resolution CCD); (2) studies on stomata function.
Green Panel (530 nm): Recommended use: excitation source for YFP (must be accompanied with the filter wheel and high-resolution CCD).
Far-Red Panel (740 nm) : Maximum total output: 1,200 mW (4 x 300 mW). Recommended use: determination of Fo' and PAR absorbance (use of filter wheel required).
PAR - NDVI Panel (660 nm + 740 nm): This panel is part of the PAR-Absorptivity and NDVI Module.


Grids for Sample Holders
Grids serve for firm and secure attachment of sample holders - Petri dishes of multi-well plates - to the desired spot on the FluorCam shelf or bottom. They are manufactured in several versions: 90 mm, 100 mm or 137 mm Petri dishes, for 120 mm square Petri dish or for multi-well plates.


Additional Protective Glasses
Radiation safety glasses protecting against excessive LED radiation – equipped with side cover and protective filters. One pair of glasses is provided with the device free of charge.


Advanced Multiple Function for FluorCam Software
Software upgrade enabling multiple scripting functions for automatic initiation and measurement of scheduled FluorCam protocols and for automatic data storage. Advanced multiple function feature allows to define time of protocol initiation with user-defined protocol, apply user defined mask for feature segmentation, automatically subtract the background based on the mask definition and analyze the measured data. The are stored as TAR files with time and date description. Useful for circadian cycle study.


Advanced Module for Automatic and Programmable Image Acquisition and Data Management
Comprehensive SW package for system control, data acquisition, image analysis and data base configuration. User friendly graphical interface PlantScreenTM Scheduler is designed to control hardware system components actions and to design experiments with an extremely high level of flexibility. Scheduling assistant implements calendar function and is designed for visualization, planning and management of the individual experiments. Complex protocols can be easily designed including dark/light adaptation schemes and executed based on user defined actions. All acquired imaging data are stored in an SQL database, processed and available for inspection and further analysis in range of seconds after recording via user-friendly graphical interface. It is an excellent tools for rapid and easy data browsing, grouping, analysis, user-defined data reprocessing and export. Key features are: straightforward access to analyzed parameters and acquired images over the time series of measurements, graphical display of trends for individual or multiple parameters, basic statistical analysis, visualization of time series image data for selected parameters and easy export function for numeric and image-based data for user defined sets of experiments. Multiple clients can be connected to the database, with different privileges assigned based on a built-in authentication mechanism.


Barcode Reader with Supporting Software
Barcode reader with FluorCam supporting software included. Used for fully automatic bar code search.

Download

Software
FluorCam 6
OS: Win2000/XP
Language: English
Size: 6.3 MB


FluorCam 7
OS: Win XP/Vista/Seven (32bit)
Language: English
Size: 6.7 MB


USB driver for FluorCam
OS: Win2000/XP
Language: English
Size: 10 KB


USB driver for FluorCam
OS: Win Vista/Seven
Language: English
Size: 10 KB


Documents
FluorCam Manual
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 10.6 MB


FluorCam Quick Start Guide
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 428 KB


NDVI Operation Manual
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 1.4 MB


Multicolor Micro-FluorCam Manual
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 7.7 MB


Installation Manual for FluorCam FC-800-D-3535
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 1.2 MB


LED Spectra
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 121 KB


FluorCam Handy Brochure
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 215 KB


FluorCam Leaf-Clip Brochure
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 169 KB


Micro-FluorCam Brochure
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 212 KB


Handy GFPCam Brochure
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 173 KB


FluorCam Device Line - List of References
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 769 KB


Driver Installation
Type: PDF
Language: English
Size: 334 KB


Other FluorCams

Open FC 800-O/1010

Open FluorCam FC 800-O is a highly modular instrument with flexible geometry. The LED panels and the light source generating saturating flashes can be arranged at various angles and distances from the sample. Also, the position of the camera relative to the sample is adjustable.


Closed FC 800-C

Closed FluorCam FC 800-C represents a highly innovative, world-wide used system of multispectral kinetic fluorescence imaging. It consists of a CCD camera and four fixed LED panels. The LED panels provide uniform irradiance over samples up to 13 x 13 cm – suitable for small plants, detached leaves, algal dilutions, etc. The system allows dark adaptation.


Closed GFPCam FC 800-C/1010GFP

Closed GFPCam FC 800-C/1010GFP serves for various applications using green fluorescent proteins in molecular and cellular biology. The device is equipped with a motorized, software-controlled filter wheel, which provides quick and simple transition between the GFP and chlorophyl fluorescence detection and imaging.


Handy FC 1000-H

Handy FluorCam FC 1000-H is a portable system designed for kinetically resolved fluorescence imaging of leaves and small plants both in a field and laboratory. The whole instrument can be carried in a convenient bag over the shoulder and can run on batteries.


Handy GFPCam FC 1000-H/GFP

Handy GFPCam FC 1000-H/GFP is a modified version of the popular Handy FluorCam. Its unique construction allows both GFP imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging. It can be favorably used for lab and field experiments.


Handy - Leaf Chamber FC 1000-LC

Leaf Chamber Fluorcam FC 1000-LC is a unique system that allows you to conduct chlorophyll fluorescence imaging on a leaf maintained in a leaf chamber, while measuring leaf gas exchange at the same time. The Fluorcam unit can be attached to leaf chambers provided by most manufacturers of leaf gas exchange equipment.


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